Author:   Kayla Benjamin   Published: 11/28/2023    Washington Informer News

A house near the northeast D.C. border, fills up with three feet of water during a rainstorm on Sept. 10, 2020. It’s important for homeowners and potential homebuyers to understand their house’s flood history and other climate change risks. (Photo courtesy of Deborah Wiggins)

A house near the northeast D.C. border, fills up with three feet of water during a rainstorm on Sept. 10, 2020. It’s important for homeowners and potential homebuyers to understand their house’s flood history and other climate change risks.

If you’re picking out clothes for the following day, you’ll probably glance at the weather forecast. If you’re making weekend plans, it’s often useful to check if the prediction includes rain or snow.

Decisions about our long-term futures, like what house to buy or how to invest in home maintenance, require a lot more information than what we can find with a quick look at an app or the local news. But homebuyers and homeowners can benefit from thinking about the weather — specifically, how the weather will change as the planet continues to warm up, and what impact it can have on their homeownership plans.

What Climate Change Has to Do with Homeownership