Conversation with Sheryl E. Ponds Founder/CEO Dai Technologies Corporation.

Author: Sheryl E. Ponds BSME, MBA  Published: 8/31/2021         Dia TechCorp

Cost Savings on EVCS Infrastructure

Our website

Everyone is not mentally ready for EV adoption. Driving EV makes sense to a lot of people, BUT they will not take the next step, because they suffer from Range Anxiety (RA) – the fear of getting stuck on the road without an outlet to charge an electric vehicle.

I totally understand it. I too struggle with Range Anxiety. Sensing and later confirming that there are many individuals like myself, who require greater access to EV charging stations, before purchasing their first EV, I launched Dai Technologies Corporation. Why not? I figured that if this new era of automotive transportation is going to take hold in the Greater Washington Area (DMV), it might as well start with me.

Eventually, I pushed in ALL my chips to build a company. My aim is to make it practical for the average driver (someone like me) from an urban and/or underserved market to switch from a car fueled by dinosaur juice to one energized with electricity.

DaiTechCorp meets DMV EV drivers’ needs through our knack for establishing tailor-made, turnkey plug-in vehicle charging programs for places where they live, work, or play.

Let’s write our EV Adoption story together. Reach out to me, I’d love to help you stare down RA!

Sheryl P.

Ida weakens to tropical storm after knocking out power to New Orleans

Author:  Erik Ortiz and Rachel Elbaum      Published: 8/30/21          NBC NEWS

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/ida-intensifies-dangerous-category-4-hurricane-n1277868

Dozens of rescue missions were launched across southern Louisiana on Monday to evacuate people stranded in their homes after Hurricane Ida battered the coast and knocked out power to virtually all of New Orleans before cutting a dangerous path north.

The powerful weather system, which weakened to a tropical storm, was one of the strongest hurricanes ever to make landfall in the region and killed at least one person outside of Baton Rouge. Major search and rescue operations to answer the hundreds of rescue calls have been hampered by inoperable 911 lines and poor cellphone service reported throughout southeastern Louisiana, including the heavily populated Orleans and Jefferson parishes.

The Louisiana National Guard activated 4,900 Guard personnel and was positioned to dispatch nearly 200 high-water vehicles and more than 70 rescue boats and 30 helicopters to aid in the search efforts. The full scope of the damage and flooding was being assessed Monday as officials dissuaded residents from straying outside because of downed lines and other debris blocking roads and said it could take weeks to restore the outages after all eight electric transmission lines feeding the city lost service.

The damage is “really catastrophic” in southeastern Louisiana, Gov. John Bel Edwards said Monday on NBC’s “TODAY” show, and officials believe the death toll could rise “considerably.”


The latest on Ida:


Edwards expressed some relief in that Louisiana’s $14 billion levee system appeared to have held up “extremely well” against Ida. The sophisticated system was designed to protect a 133-mile perimeter around the New Orleans metro area from intense flooding.

“It didn’t overtop. There was no failure. The situation in New Orleans, as bad it was today without the power, would be so much worse,” Edwards said, hinting at the devastation that Hurricane Katrina brought in 2005 and prompted improvements and extensive investment to the levees in the years since.

“This storm packed a very powerful punch. It delivered the surge that was forecasted, the wind that was forecasted and the rain,” the governor added, estimating that recovery from Ida will take months.

Electric utilities reported that more than 1 million homes and businesses were without power in Louisiana and another 110,000 in Mississippi. Entergy New Orleans, the main power utility in the city, with nearly 200,000 customers, said all of New Orleans lost electricity early Sunday evening because of “catastrophic damage” to its transmission system. The company tweeted Monday that it “will likely take days to determine the extent of damage to our power grid in metro New Orleans and far longer to restore electrical transmission to the region.”

The National Hurricane Center said that the rain and storm surge “resulted in catastrophic impacts along the southeast coast of Louisiana.” It warned of dangerous storm surges and flash floods around southeastern Louisiana and southern Mississippi after Ida made landfall as a Category 4 storm with howling 150 mph winds on the same day that Hurricane Katrina struck 16 years earlier.

Notice of Funding Availability -Solar Works DC – The District’s Low-Income Solar Photovoltaic (PV) Systems Installation and Job Training Program

Author: DOEE Staff      Published: 8/20/2021         DOEE

DOEE Agency logo

DOEE is seeking eligible entities to submit an application to implement Solar Works DC, a Low-Income Solar Photovoltaic (PV) Systems Installation and Job Training Program for 150 underserved or underemployed District residents, ages 18 years old and older. Trainees will gain knowledge and experience needed in solar installation and to work all facets of the solar industry and related fields. This RFA seeks proposals to expand and build on the existing program through implementation of a creative, innovative, and effective year-round solar training and installation program. Solar Works DC provides trainees classroom education and hands-on experience by installing solar PV systems on income-eligible single-family homes and small multifamily dwellings.

Beginning August 20, 2021, the full text of the Request for Applications (RFA) will be available.

A person may obtain a copy of this RFA by any of the following means:

Download from the attachments below.

Email a request to solarworksdc2021@dc.gov with “Request copy of RFA 2021-2123-EA” in the subject line.

The deadline for application submissions is September 20, 2021. The online application must be time stamped by 11:59 p.m. on the date the application is due. E-mail the completed application to solarworksdc2021@dc.gov.

Eligibility
All the listed institutions below may apply for this grant:

  • Nonprofit organizations, with an IRS 501(c)(3)or 501(c)(4) determinations;

For additional information regarding this RFA, write to: solarworksdc2021@dc.gov.

Democrats Introduce John Lewis Voting Law To Restore The Voting Rights Act

Author: Paul Blumenthal

Rep. Terri Sewell (D-Ala.) speaking at a rally introducing the 2019 version of H.R.4, the Voting Rights Advancement Act. She

House Democrats introduced long-awaited updated legislation on Tuesday to reauthorize sections of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 that have been gutted in recent years by the Supreme Court’s conservative majority.

The John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act (H.R. 4), named for the late congressman and civil rights champion, is meant to undo Supreme Court rulings that gave states and jurisdictions more leeway to put restrictions on voting access that are now being enacted at an alarming rate.

The latest version of the legislation creates a new formula for identifying discriminatory election practices in states and jurisdictions previously covered by the Voting Rights Act preclearance provision, which allowed the Department of Justice to review local laws for discrimination prior to their enactment. The bill also reinstates provisions in the Voting Rights Act, recently gutted in the court’s Brnovich v. DNC decision, that enable judicial review after an election law is enacted.

Rep. Terri Sewell (D-Ala.), the bill’s chief sponsor, unveiled the new bill in front of the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, the site of the 1965 Bloody Sunday civil rights march where Alabama troopers beat protesters including Lewis, then the leader of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, fracturing his skull. The march and the attack on demonstrators led President Lyndon Johnson to call on Congress to pass the Voting Rights Act, which made Jim Crow election laws illegal in the former Confederacy and other jurisdictions with a history of discrimination.

“The right to vote is the most sacred and fundamental right we enjoy as American citizens and one that the Foot Soldiers fought, bled, and died for in my hometown of Selma, Alabama,” Sewell said in a statement. “Today, old battles have become new again as we face the most pernicious assault on the right to vote in generations. It’s clear: federal oversight is urgently needed.”

Rep. Terri Sewell (D-Ala.) speaking at a rally introducing the 2019 version of H.R.4, the Voting Rights Advancement Act. She introduced a new version in 2021.

The bill to reauthorize the gutted Voting Rights Act sections was named for Lewis after he died in 2020. Democrats began work on the legislation after the Supreme Court’s 2013 Shelby County v. Holder decision declared the existing preclearance formula for identifying discriminatory election practices outdated and unconstitutional.

Since Democrats regained control of the House in the 2018 midterms, they have held a series of committee hearings to draft a new preclearance formula while building a legislative record showing its necessity when the new law faces an almost certain judicial challenge.

In a report outlining the need for a new preclearance formula, the Committee on House Administration detailed six aspects of modern election laws that are discriminatory and should be reviewed under the Voting Rights Act while also asserting Congress’ constitutional authority to enact legislation to prevent such discrimination. These practices include voter roll purges; voter identification and citizenship requirements; lack of access to language assistance; polling place closures, changes and wait times; limited access to early or non-Election Day voting; and changes to jurisdictional boundaries and redistricting.

The report shows that “Congress has not only an ironclad Constitutional mandate, but a moral responsibility to enact H.R. 4 to combat destructive and discriminatory voter suppression,” Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) said in a statement. “In doing so, we live up to the powerful legacy of this bill’s late namesake, Congressman Lewis: a titan of the Civil Rights Movement and a courageous champion for voting rights.”

The John Lewis law now joins the For The People Act, a voting rights bill that Lewis helped to write before passing, as the two key pieces of legislation Democrats hope to pass to protect and expand voting rights in the 21st century.

Democrats see the bills as addressing different needs. The For The People Act sets a national floor for voter access while the John Lewis law enables protection from future discriminatory practices.

But both bills now face an uphill battle to passage as Republicans have become almost 100% unified in their opposition to expanding voting rights and making it easier to vote.

A horse-drawn carriage carrying the body of civil rights icon and former Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.) crosses the Edmund Pettus Br

A horse-drawn carriage carrying the body of civil rights icon and former Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.) crosses the Edmund Pettus Bridge as it prepares to pass members of his family on July 26, 2020, in Selma, Alabama.

Since legislation currently requires 60 votes in the Senate to clear a filibuster to even begin debate, both bills would require the support of 10 Republicans. Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) is currently the lone Republican supporter of the John Lewis voting law. (She does not support the For The People Act.) For these bills to pass, Democrats will need to change the Senate’s filibuster rules in some fashion.

Democrats view the passage of both bills in the most urgent terms as Republicans at the state level enact a new wave of election laws making it harder to vote and easier for partisan Republicans to subvert election rules and results they don’t like after the fact. This new attack on voting rights is inspired by former President Donald Trump’s lies that he did not lose the 2020 election. These lies led directly to the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol and continue to reverberate as Republicans use them to enact discriminatory election laws.

High-level Democratic politicians strongly support altering the Senate’s filibuster rules. Former President Barack Obama called on the Senate to end the filibuster in order to pass the John Lewis voting law at Lewis’ funeral in 2020, labeling it a “Jim Crow relic” primarily used in history to block civil rights legislation. Lewis’ family members also recently joined calls for Democrats to end the filibuster to pass voting rights laws.

A previous version of the John Lewis bill passed the House in 2019 with only one Republican’s support, but the Senate, then under Republican control, never held a hearing or a vote on the legislation. House Democrats plan to vote on the bill the week of Aug. 23. The bill will then move to the Senate, where Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) promised that voting rights would be the first order of business in the chamber in September after Republicans blocked debate on the For The People Act for the second time.

FDA Grants Full Approval of Pfizer Vaccine, Critics Blast Agency for Lack of Data, Scientific Debate

Author: Megan Redshaw       Published: 8/23/2021       CHD

The FDA today granted full approval to the Pfizer/BioNTech COVID vaccine for people 16 years and older.

Critics said it was concerning that full approval was based on only six months’ worth of data — despite clinical trials designed for two years — and that there was no public discussion of the data.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) today granted full approval to the Pfizer/BioNTech COVID vaccine for people 16 years and older — without allowing public discussion or holding a formal advisory committee meeting to discuss data.

This is the first COVID vaccine approved by the FDA, and is expected to open the door to more vaccine mandates by employers and universities.

“For businesses and universities that have been thinking about putting vaccine requirements in place in order to create safer spaces for people to work and learn, I think this move from the FDA, when it comes, will actually help them to move forward with those kinds of plans,” U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy on Sunday told CNN’s Brianna Keilar.

“The FDA’s approval of this vaccine is a milestone as we continue to battle the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Dr. Janet Woodcock, acting FDA commissioner in a press release issued Monday.

“While this and other vaccines have met the FDA’s rigorous, scientific standards for emergency use authorization, as the first FDA-approved COVID-19 vaccine, the public can be very confident this vaccine meets the high standards for safety, effectiveness and manufacturing quality the FDA requires of an approved product.”

Woodcock said she believes FDA approval will instill additional confidence in people to get vaccinated.

According to The Washington Post, Pfizer’s vaccine approval was the fastest in the agency’s history, coming less than four months after Pfizer/BioNTech filed for licensing on May 7.

“It’s been remarkably fast,” said Holly Fernandez Lynch, a bioethics expert and lawyer at the University of Pennsylvania, who said careful handling of the approval was crucial to potentially persuading the “vaccine hesitant” to receive the licensed product.

The approval of Pfizer’s COVID vaccine was based on its clinical trial of 44,000 people — half of whom got the shots, the company said. The median six-month follow-up period for safety and efficacy began after participants received their second dose, Pfizer said.

“Based on the longer-term follow-up data we submitted, today’s approval for those aged 16 and over affirms the efficacy and safety profile of our vaccine at a time when it is urgently needed,” Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla said in a statement. “I am hopeful this approval will help increase confidence in our vaccine.”

The company plans to follow the 44,000 enrollees for a total of 24 months, from the start of the trial. In order to qualify for FDA Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) last December, Pfizer followed trial participants for a median of only two months after participants received their second dose.

Pfizer’s COVID vaccine received EUA on Dec. 11, 2020, for use in individuals 16 years and older. On May 10, the authorization was expanded to include 12- through 15-year-olds.

According to the FDA, EUAs can be used by the agency during public health emergencies to provide access to medical products that may be effective in preventing, diagnosing or treating a disease, provided the FDA determines that the known and potential benefits of a product, when used to prevent, diagnose or treat the disease, outweigh the known and potential risks of the product.

Pfizer’s vaccine will remain under EUA for 12- through 15-year-olds, and for a third dose in certain immunocompromised individuals.

However, full approval gives doctors flexibility in using vaccinations for “off-label use,” which is not permitted for EUA products. This would allow doctors to give patients booster shots before the FDA clears them.

Data released Friday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) showed that between Dec. 14, 2020 and Aug. 13, 2021, a total of 326,535 adverse events had been reported to the Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System (VAERS) attributed to Pfizer’s COVID vaccine, including 9,027 deaths and 56,607 serious injuries.

Ohio Next for Adult-Use Legalization?

Author: New Frontier Data Staff     Published: 8/23/2021            NFD

August 23, 2021

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Insight of the Week

From New Frontier Data Analysts

Competing Adult-Use Measures Still Making the Rounds in Ohio 

By Noah Tomares, Research Analyst

 

Last month, Ohio lawmakers formally introduced a bill to legalize the possession, production, and sale of adult-use cannabis. The bill would permit possession of up to 5 ounces of cannabis for adults ages 21 or older, and allow them to cultivate up to 12 plants for personal use.

 

For its part, the Coalition to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol (CTRMLA) respectively launched its ballot initiative proposing to legalize possession of up to 2.5 ounces of cannabis and up to 15 grams of concentrates for adults aged 21 and older, while permitting individuals to grow up to 6 plants for personal use, with a maximum of 12 plants per household.

Featured Report

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Cannabis in the U.S.

2021 Mid-Year Market Update

We are pleased to offer you access to one of New Frontier Data’s latest reports, Cannabis in the U.S. 2021 Mid-Year Market Update, where we provide an update on expanding legalization efforts nationwide and the trajectory of the industry in 2021 and beyond.

 

Watch a short sneak peek video to learn more, and access the full report with the button below.

CannaWeek Corner

Listen to this week’s episode of New Frontier Data’s weekly podcast

California Cannabis – A Cultivated Perspective

This week on CannaWeek, we are joined by Kiskanu Founders, Gretchen and Jason Miller, and New Frontier Data Chief Knowledge Officer, John Kagia. Our guests explore the world of cultivation in one of the largest cannabis markets in the world, California. Gretchen and Jason have been operating in California for 20+ years, and share with us a unique look into the current market – from challenges to opportunities.

In the News

Curated cannabis industry news stories from the week

Legal Marijuana Sales to Reach $43 Billion By 2025

Recreational marijuana sales in the United States are projected to reach $43 billion annually by 2025.

Cannabis sales have increased to historic levels in recent months, with sales totaling nearly $6 billion in the first quarter of this year, New Frontier Data reported…

Read More

The Cannabis-COVID Connection: What We Know And What We Don’t Know

As the world continues to contend with COVID-19, much about the virus remains uncertain, including its interactions with cannabis…

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Cannabis company Tilray acquires stake Medmen notes in bet on U.S. legalization

Shares of Canadian cannabis company Tilray jumped nearly 5% in extended trading on Tuesday after announcing it invested American cannabis retailer Medmen

Read More

3 Off-the-Radar Small-Cap Growth Stocks I Bought in August

For nearly 17 months, investors have enjoyed what’s arguably the greatest bounce-back rally from a bear-market bottom in history. As of this past weekend, the benchmark S&P 500 had doubled from its March 2020 coronavirus pandemic low. In other words, long-term investing wins again…

Read More

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This Week in Energy: How Wholesale Power Markets Work, Renewable Integration Study

Author: Our Energy Policy Staff       Published: 8/23/2021    info@ourenergypolicy.org

This Week in Energy

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August 16, 2021
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August 17, 2021
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August 19, 2021
If you would like to receive an update on more recently added publications, sign up for the OurEnergyLibrary Monthly Digest. See our most recent edition.
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Featured Energy Events
  • When: Thursday, August 26, 12:00-1:00 PM Eastern Time
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Visit our Events Calendar to see more events from organizations across the country.
In this episode of the GT Power Hour podcast, Commissioner Allison Clements of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) delves into her perspectives on transmission, public participation, the grid of the future. She also touches on representation and inclusion in the energy sector, her love of the band Wilco, and split allegiances in the age-old Michigan-Ohio rivalry.

Uncertainty on reconciliation as House returns

Author: Geof Koss      Published:  8/23/2021        E&E NEWS

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) during a press conference on climate action.

Democrats will try to advance a two-track infrastructure legislative strategy this week, while looking to overcome an open rift between centrists and leadership, and unresolved questions about competing priorities on both sides of the Capitol.

The House will return later today for an unusual but brief interruption of the extended August recess to vote on the $3.5 trillion budget resolution, S. Con Res. 14, that the Senate passed earlier this month.

Both chambers approving the resolution is a key step to unlock the budget reconciliation process that allows certain bills to pass the Senate by a simple majority, denying Republicans the right to filibuster.

But the immediate challenge is overcoming resistance from a band of nine centrist Democrats, who want Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) to first schedule a vote on the $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure package, H.R. 3684, that also passed the Senate earlier this month.

The group, led by Rep. Josh Gottheimer (D-N.J.), dug in on the weeklong standoff Friday, releasing a joint statement reiterating its view that Congress should send the bipartisan bill to President Biden immediately (Greenwire, Aug. 20).

“We’ve got great ability here to fight climate change through this package,” Gottheimer said Friday on MSNBC, addressing a chief concern of liberals over the Senate bill, which includes about $550 billion in new spending for climate resiliency, the power sector and electric vehicles, among other issues.

“Let’s just get it done, move it forward and immediately move to reconciliation just like the Senate,” Gottheimer added.

But House Transportation and Infrastructure Chair Peter DeFazio (D-Ore.) questioned the centrists’ logic last week. “If we were to pass this bill as is, I don’t know that we would even see a reconciliation bill come out of the Senate,” he said during an event sponsored by The Washington Post. “I think that we have to hold them both.”

Furthermore, DeFazio said the timing of a vote on the Senate package was irrelevant, given that the bill’s effective date doesn’t kick in until the new fiscal year begins this fall. “If we passed it tomorrow, it goes into effect Oct.1,” he said. “If we pass it Sept. 30, it goes into effect Oct. 1.”

The nine — already under attack from the left for accepting donations from fossil fuel interests — drew more fire Friday from Evergreen Action, which urged Democrats to “waste no time before advancing the budget resolution” (Greenwire, Aug. 19).

“The nine Democrats threatening to derail the budget resolution cannot call themselves Biden Democrats while blocking President Biden’s agenda,” said Evergreen Action Executive Director Jamal Raad in a statement.

“The American people gave Joe Biden and Congress a clear mandate to act on a bold climate agenda,” Raad said. “These nine Democratic members are threatening to stand in the way of Joe Biden’s climate plan, while their own constituents are losing their lives, jobs and homes to climate disasters.”

But the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, a top supporter of the Senate bipartisan infrastructure bill, is running ads in support of the nine Democrats in their districts, The Hill reported Friday.

Pelosi, cheered on by liberals in her caucus, isn’t backing down from her decision to hold off on passing the Senate bill until the reconciliation package advances, whenever that can happen.

In a letter to members this weekend, the speaker said, “Any delay to passing the budget resolution threatens the timetable for delivering the historic progress and the transformative vision that Democrats share.”

The Rules Committee will meet at 11 a.m. today to set floor debate parameters for the budget resolution. In a bid backed by the White House to mollify the moderate bloc, the combined rule will also set debate terms for the Senate infrastructure bill, as well as new voting rights legislation. Final passage of the budget resolution and the voting rights bill — but not the bipartisan infrastructure package — will likely happen tomorrow.

Separately, the Senate Banking Subcommittee on Housing, Transportation and Community Development, led by Sen. Tina Smith (D-Minn.), will hold a hearing tomorrow on Minnesota transit issues.

 

Reconciliation plans

The longer-term challenge Democrats face is assembling their respective reconciliation bills, which are already under development in both chambers. Biden met virtually late last week with Pelosi and House committee chairs to plot strategy.

“The meeting was marked by a determination to produce results — and soon,” Pelosi said in a Thursday statement.

The House will go first on reconciliation and will “spearhead” the writing of the bill, according to a report released last week by Budget Chair John Yarmuth (D-Ky.). That’s to comply with the Constitution’s origination clause, which mandates that revenue bills start in the House.

While there are procedural moves that are frequently employed to circumvent the requirement, it is expected to be strictly observed to conform to the rules that govern the reconciliation process.

But in the Senate, Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) has already tasked his committee chairs with drafting their respective portions of the reconciliation bill, with a Sept. 15 deadline looming for presenting it to the Democratic caucus. Schumer wants to move the bill as quickly as possible after that.

How the two chambers will reconcile their competing reconciliation bills remains an open question. For instance, on clean energy taxes — which will be paramount to meeting Biden’s emissions targets — the tax-writing panels in each chamber are pushing their own plans.

House Ways and Means Chair Richard Neal (D-Mass.) is supporting the “Growing Renewable Energy and Efficiency Now (GREEN) Act,” H.R. 848, which contains long-term extensions and expansions of key clean energy tax breaks.

Senate Finance Chair Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) is equally committed to his own clean energy tax overhaul, the “Clean Energy for America Act,” S. 1298, that advanced through his panel earlier this year.

Wyden’s proposal would also extend and expand crucial incentives, although it broadly attempts to streamline the energy tax code by consolidating credits into three technology-neutral categories intended to boost production of clean electricity, transportation fuels and energy efficiency.

The Senate bill would also cancel long-standing tax breaks enjoyed by fossil fuel interests, a potential flashpoint for moderate Democrats from oil-, gas- and coal-producing states in the 50-50 Senate.

House tax-writers may have the upper hand on their Senate colleagues because of the origination clause, but aides and lobbyists say they don’t expect the “GREEN Act” to be the last word on the subject.

Another looming hiccup is the manner in which reconciliation instructions are meted out to House and Senate committees. In large part because of jurisdictional differences across the Capitol, panels that are tasked with writing the bills have different spending allocations guiding them that are expected to produce varying approaches to the underlying policies.

For example, the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee is allocated $198 billion under the budget resolution to write its portion of the reconciliation package, the centerpiece of which will be a clean energy standard.

By contrast, the allocation for the House Energy and Commerce Committee, which will draft the House’s CES plan, is more than twice that amount at $486.5 billion. That reflects the broad jurisdiction of the House panel, which includes health care as well as environmental issues under the purview of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee.

Those discrepancies are resolvable, aides say, but may well produce starkly different legislative provisions that ultimately will have to pass muster with Democrats who hail from across the political spectrum in both chambers.

Another hurdle is the bipartisan deal itself. While Biden reportedly made assurances to the small band of bipartisan senators that negotiated the package that the administration will not “double-dip” — or look to increase spending on specific areas in the reconciliation bill — DeFazio made clear that he is looking to do exactly that on transit, wastewater and climate policies.

“I didn’t sign that agreement,” he said last week. “In fact, I don’t believe anybody in the majority in the Senate, except for a couple of senators, signed off on that agreement. We are working with the White House to see if there are ways around it. I’m looking at creating new programs that are not the same as the ones that were funded there.”

Schedule: The House Rules Committee hearing is Monday, Aug. 23, at 11 a.m. in H-313 Capitol and via webcast.

Schedule: The Banking hearing is Tuesday, Aug. 24, at 10 a.m. via webcast.

Witnesses:

  • Margaret Anderson, Minnesota Department of Transportation commissioner.
  • Charlie Zelle, Metropolitan Council chair.
  • Irene Fernando, Hennepin County commissioner.
  • Alison Zelms, Rochester, Minn., administrator.
  • Ryan Timlin, Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1005 president.
  • Nuria Fernandez, administrator of the Federal Transit Administration.

Community Solar Project Launched In Montgomery County

Author: mcgreenbank Staff          Published: 8/23/2021        MCGreenbank.org

Community Solar Project Lunched In Montgomery County

 

Equity-Focused Installation Is First of Its Kind in Montgomery County

Montgomery County’s first community solar project to include a set aside for low- and moderate-income (LMI) households was celebrated at an August 17 ground-breaking at Paddington Square Apartments, the host property for the solar array project.
Pictured (Left to Right): David Wright (Groundswell, Director of Project Development), Lorig Charkoudian (Maryland State Delegate), Stacey Hughes (SunLightGeneral Capital), Bonnie Norman (Montgomery County Green Bank, Chair), Adriana Hochberg (Montgomery County ACAO), Kayrine Brown (HOC, Acting Executive Director), Marc Elrich (Montgomery County Executive), Councilmember Will Jawando, Council Vice President Gabe Albornoz, Tom Deyo (Montgomery County Green Bank, CEO)

The Community Solar at Paddington Square project will offer 91 subscriptions to local households who want to be a part of an equitable clean energy future for Montgomery County with 28 of these subscriptions set aside for low- and moderate-income households.  And, this community solar project will reduce green house gas emissions by 235 metric tons per year, which is equivalent to removing 51 cars from the road each year.

To watch full the event click here

“The Paddington Square community solar project aligns with the County’s efforts to combat climate change and eliminate greenhouse gas emissions by 2035,” said County Executive Marc Elrich. “I applaud the project’s attention to members in our community who are most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change and I am appreciative of the hard work of the project partners to bring this project into fruition.”

“We are excited to see this equitable community solar project come online to offer the opportunity for all residents to have access to renewable energy,” said Tom Deyo, CEO of the Montgomery County Green Bank. “The collaboration with Pepco, the County, and the project partners has made this effort possible to deliver benefits to County residents and to support the County’s drive to meet its greenhouse gas reduction goals.”

See full Press Release by clicking here

The Green Bank now offers a broad portfolio of affordable renewable energy and energy efficiency financing options for commercial and residential property improvements. Its suite of products include the Clean Energy Advantage program for homeowners and the Commercial Loan for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy program, the  Small Business Energy Savings Support program, and the Commercial Solar PPA program for businesses.

The Montgomery County Green Bank is a publicly-chartered nonprofit dedicated to accelerating affordable energy efficiency and clean energy investment in Montgomery County, MD. We partner with the private sector to build a more diverse, equitable, and inclusively prosperous, resilient, sustainable, and healthy community. Our work supports Montgomery County’s goal to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions. Visit us at www.mcgreenbank.org.

Solar could be 40% of US generation by 2035, but it needs more investment, White House report finds Published Aug. 20, 2021

Author:  Emma Penrod           Published: 8/21 /2021        Utility Dive

Dive Brief:

  • Solar power could represent 40% of U.S. electrical generation and could sustain as many as 1.5 million jobs by 2035, according to a report on the Biden administration’s solar policies released by the White House on Tuesday.
  • To decarbonize the U.S. grid by 2035, the nation must deploy solar at three to four times the current rate, according to the report. The extension of investment and production tax credits by Congress could increase the rate of deployment, as could new incentives for storage and transmission projects, the report says.
  • Solar industry groups praised the report for highlighting the industry’s growth and potential, and expressed optimism that it signals potential reforms to tax policy and other potential incentives

Dive Insight:

Solar will play a critical role in decarbonizing the U.S. electric grid, but only if the pace of deployment and investment accelerates, the White House report stated.

Citing an as-yet unreleased analysis by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the report indicates that deployment of solar must accelerate to three to four times its current rate by 2030 in order to decarbonize the electric grid by 2035. The report noted several congressional actions to accomplish this goal, including the extension of investment and production tax credits, the creation of new incentives for transmission and storage projects, and promoting community and residential solar for low- and moderate-income households.

“It’s encouraging to see the Biden administration continue to prioritize accelerating the transition to a renewable energy economy,” Gregory Wetstone, president and CEO of the American Council on Renewable Energy (ACORE), said in a statement. “As the report makes clear, seizing this growth opportunity will require rapid transformation of the power sector and significant investment in a 21st century grid. But the payoff will be both climate protection and greater economic prosperity.”

Tax reformation, Wetstone continued, will be a critical step in achieving the White House’s goals. “We must move the renewable sector beyond the endless cycle of temporary stopgap measures to a stable, predictable, and long-term clean energy tax platform that helps decarbonize the economy while putting millions of Americans back to work,” he said.

Alisa Petersen, manager of RMI’s U.S. program, noted that although investor-owned utilities, municipalities and co-ops own 55% of the U.S.’s generating capacity, they currently own just 11% of utility-scale solar installations. Creating a direct pay tax credit, she said, would create more credit flexibility and allow these organizations to deploy more solar resources. One analysis, she said, projected that creating a solar production tax credit with a direct pay option would double emissions reductions, compared to extending the full value of existing credits.

The Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA) also called for attention to trade policy while praising the report. In a note sent to SEIA members on Tuesday, SEIA president and CEO Abigail Roth Hopper noted that four companies have filed anonymous petitions for new tariffs on solar cell and module imports from Malaysia, Vietnam and Thailand.

“The disruptive and harmful impact of new trade petitions and CBP [U.S. Customs and Border Protection]*>> making sure that’s the CBP she means* ***That’s correct she spells it out earlier in the letter*** enforcement action cannot be understated,” she wrote. “SEIA will continue to aggressively oppose any effort to unfairly favor one set of imports over another, or trade actions that hinder our industry’s ability to meet critical climate goals.”

Rev. Dr. Ambrose Carrol : Building Power for Change, Environmental Justice.

Author: Geoff Benders of the Arc      Green The Church

I met the Rev. Dr. Ambrose Carroll when we both traveled to northern Minnesota in early June 2021 to support the water protectors who are resisting the building of a pipeline, called Line 3, that will bring even more dirty tar sands oil from Alberta, Canada to the Great Lakes. We were both there as part of an interfaith delegation in support of the Indigenous leaders who are putting their bodies on line to stop the building of this pipeline that will cut right through the treaty lands of the Anishinaabe people. You can find out more here.

Ambrose is the pastor of The Church by the Side of the Road in Berkeley, CA. He has a long resume of being a pastor and chaplain. He was a green fall fellow with Van Jones in Denver, CO working on green jobs and environmental justice. He met Sally Bingham, the founder of Interfaith Power & Light, and realized there aren’t many Black churches who are part of that movement and realized that has to change.

I wanted to speak with Pastor Ambrose because he and his church are on the front lines of racial, social and environmental justice. We talked about the inner spiritual work of love as well as the outer work of social and environmental justice. We can’t do one without the other, he says. This is the ongoing story of environmental racism toward Indigenous people and people of color who bear a disproportionate burden of environmental degradation and pollution. But it is also a sign of hope that as we stand in solidarity with our Indigenous brothers and sisters, we are also recognizing and standing with BIPOC communities near and far.

*Just a note, I was speaking to Pastor Ambrose outside one of the Treaty People Gathering events so you will hear voices and other noise in the background. I hope you enjoy this conversation as much as I did.

 

Green The Church

 National Virtual Summit
Green Lessons from Black Wall Street
Infrastructure, Agriculture, and Equity

…for the people had a mind to work – Nehemiah 4:6c

Sunday, October 10, 2021 – Wednesday, October 13, 2021

GTC 2021 Summit Honorary Chair
Rev. Dr. Gerald L. Durley

Interfaith Power & Light Board Chair
Pastor Emeritus, Providence Missionary Baptist Church, Atlanta GA

GTC 2021 Summit Honoree
Mrs. Veronica Kyle

Statewide Outreach Director at Faith in Place, Adjunct Professor and CoFounder of the EcoWomanist institute.

Summit Program Agenda

$100 Registration

“Go back to the past and bring forward that which is useful.”

$25.00 Student Registration

“Go back to the past and bring forward that which is useful.”

For more information on becoming an event sponsor or exhibitor, please click here.

Interested in Volunteer Opportunities for this event? Click here.

 

Hanwha Q Cells opens the largest solar factory in the Western Hemisphere

Author: Christian Roselund   Published:  9/23/2019 PV Magazine   republished 8/18/21  PCPC

The 300,000 square foot factory in Dalton, Georgia has the capacity to produce 12,000 PV modules per day, or 1.7 GW annually – the same peak generating capacity as the Hoover Dam.

Friday was a big day for U.S. module manufacturing. Hanwha Q-Cells, the Korean PV maker which acquired Germany’s Q-Cells seven years ago, has officially opened the biggest solar panel factory in the Western Hemisphere, with 300,000 square feet of floor space and 650 workers.

Of course opening is always a relative term. Friday was the big ribbon cutting with officials from Korea, Georgia Governor Brian Kemp (R) and even a token presence from the Trump Administration, but the factory has been churning out modules for months; every solar factory must go through a lengthy process of equipment tests and calibration, and then will be slowly producing more and more modules (ramping) until it hits its full production volume.

Hanwha Q Cells executives report that the factory began production in January and started shipments in February, and that all three production lines are currently running. “The factory is currently producing over 10,000 modules per day and very close to the full 12,000 module per day capacity,” Hanwha Q Cells Director of Strategy and Market Intelligence Scott Moskowitz told pv magazine. “We expect to be running at full capacity by the end of the year.”

The factory will make modules with 120 half-cut mono-PERC cells in the company’s Q.PEAK DUO BLK-G6 line. These have six busbars, around 19% module efficiency and a wattage of 330-345 watts, which is not bad for what would be a 60-cell module in full-cell terms.

These modules are being sold into both the rooftop and large-scale ground-mounted solar markets. While 72-cell modules are more popular for large PV plants, some of the projects that will utilize these modules are Facebook’s new data center in Georgia.

 

Trump, tariffs and taxes

Greentech Media has cast this as a win for Trump’s trade policies, but there is a lot of nuance here. Four large solar factories are either under construction, ramping or have opened in the United States since Trump imposed the Section 201 tariffs: Hanwha’s 1.7 GW factory in Georgia, LG’s 500 MW factory in Alabama, Jinko Solar’s 400 MW factory in Florida, and First Solar’s 1.2 GW factory in Lake Township, Ohio – which is currently under construction.

It’s a safe bet to say that these would not have happened without the Section 201 tariffs giving a relative edge to product made in the United States. But as every one of these companies has told pv magazine, they also probably would not have happened without the changes to the U.S. tax code under the tax reform rammed through by Republican majorities in Congress in late 2017.

Also, while these factories and a the smaller ones that had held or or started back up total around 5 GW of capacity, the United States is expected to install more than 12 GW of solar this year – more than double the nation’s entire module capacity.

Also, the cell sector is almost completely missing in the United States. There are no merchant cell factories in the United States, and all of the crystalline silicon factories that have recently ramped up import cells from overseas. In fact, the one big integrated cell and module factory in the United States – the Tesla/Panasonic Gigafactory in Upstate New York – does not appear to be producing much.

As such, the minor revival of U.S module manufacturing that these factories represent does not change the fundamental nature of trade flows or manufacturing in the solar industry; the United States still overwhelmingly installs imported solar products, mostly from Asia.

 

Update: This article was updated at 10:12 AM EST on September 23 to include more information on the ramping of the factory.

This content is protected by copyright and may not be reused. If you want to cooperate with us and would like to reuse some of our content, please contact: editors@pv-magazine.com.

AABE Webinar Series: Congressional Progress Report – The AABE Digital Series – VIEW LINK

Author: AABE Staff   Published: 8/18/2021          AABE
Congressional Progress Report – The AABE Digital Series – VIEW LINK
American Association of Blacks in Energy <info@aabe.ccsend.com>on behalf of 
American Association of Blacks in Energy <aabe@aabe.org>
Wed 8/18/2021 1:10 PM
Thank you for registering for our webinar! We go live in less than 1 hour please view via this link!
Moderating this panel is Eric Grey: Managing Director Government Relations at Edison Electric Institute
  • Joined by Mary Martin – Chief Counsel, Energy and Environment at house Committee on Energy and Commerce
  • Scott Matus – Senior Policy Advisor at US House of Representatives
Ralph Cleveland
Sincerely,
Ralph Cleveland
Interim President and CEO
American Association of Blacks in Energy
202-371-9530

Solar Comparison Shopping Gets Easier for DC Residents Thanks to Department of Energy and Environment Partnership With EnergySage

Author: Brent Peterson                  Published: 8/17/2021            DOEE

DC press release(DOEE) – (202) 617-1097; brent.peterson@dc.gov

EnergySage gives District residents a simple, trustworthy way to research quotes for rooftop solar panels and community solar programs

(WASHINGTON, DC and BOSTON, MA) – In an effort to advance the District’s ambitious environmental goals, the DC Department of Energy and Environment (DOEE) has teamed up with EnergySage to help District residents comparison shop options for installing solar panels on their property or subscribing to a local community solar farm.

EnergySage is the country’s leading online marketplace for consumers to learn about and comparison-shop all things solar, including home batteries and community solar subscriptions.

“Through our partnership with EnergySage, the District aims to demystify the complexities of going solar by increasing the resources available to our residents,” said DOEE Director Tommy Wells. “For the District to successfully transition to a clean energy future, we need the participation from all of our residents. EnergySage helps make the path to investing in solar smoother and less intimidating.”

Mayor Muriel Bowser has committed the District to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 50 percent by 2032, with the overall goal of a carbon free DC by 2050. Furthermore the Clean Energy DC Omnibus Act of 2018 mandates that 100 percent of the District’s energy supply come from Tier 1 renewable energy sources by 2032; at least 10 percent of that energy must come from solar energy generated locally.

“Needless to say, we’re big fans of the goals the District has set for the region and of the steps the DOEE has taken thus far to achieve them,” said EnergySage Vice President of Partnerships Tess O’Brien. “Our work together will not only make clean energy more affordable and accessible for District residents, but also provide a boost to the local economy by bringing more business to solar companies in the area.”

Developed with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, the EnergySage site allows customers to easily obtain competing online quotes from prescreened solar installers, financing companies and solar farm developers. The company places a huge emphasis on education and provides localized information about the costs and benefits of solar. District residents should feel empowered to use EnergySage tools and resources to make confident, informed solar decisions.

EnergySage is recommended by more than 100 prominent organizations that use the platform to help their employees, customers, members, residents, etc., explore solar—including utilities, municipalities, universities, and corporations.

DOEE and EnergySage is holding an information session on Wednesday, August 18 at 1:00 pm for District residents, landlords, and clean energy stakeholders. Explore and register here.

To learn more about EnergySage, visit energysage.com/p/dc_doee/ 

###

About the Department of Energy and Environment

The Department of Energy and Environment (DOEE) is the leading authority on energy and environmental issues affecting the District of Columbia. DOEE’s mission is to improve the quality of life for the residents and natural inhabitants of the nation’s capital by protecting and restoring the environment, conserving our natural resources, mitigating pollution, increasing access to clean and renewable energy, and educating the public on ways to secure a sustainable future. The agency’s core responsibilities include, but are not limited to, enforcing environmental regulations; monitoring and assessing environmental risks; developing energy and environmental policies; issuing permits; and providing residents and local businesses with funding, technical assistance, and information on initiatives designed to ensure a more resilient and sustainable city. We perform all agency mission activities with the highest integrity to uphold the public trust. Visit DOEE’s web page to learn more about the agency’s impact on the nation’s capital.

About EnergySage, Inc.

EnergySage is the leading online comparison-shopping marketplace for rooftop solar, energy storage, project financing, and community solar. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, EnergySage is trusted by over 10 million consumers across the country to help them make smarter energy decisions through simplicity, transparency, and choice. Unlike traditional lead-generation websites, EnergySage empowers consumers to request and compare competing quotes online from a network of more than 500 pre-screened installation companies – a formula that is proven to result in a higher rate of adoption, 20 percent lower prices on average for consumers, and significantly lower costs for renewable energy providers. For these reasons, leading organizations like Connecticut Green Bank, DSIRE, Environment America, Kaiser Permanente, and National Grid refer their audiences to EnergySage. Visit EnergySage for more information, and follow us on FacebookInstagramLinkedInTwitter, and YouTube.

 

logos

https://www.energy.gov/eere/solar/solar-photovoltaic-technology-basics

 

Solar Workforce Priorities and Vision

Author: US DOE Staff       8/17/2021         SETO

Two photos of people working on solar panels and text advertising a webinar on Solar Workforce on August 19, 2021, at 1 pm ET

August 19, 2021, 1-2 p.m. ET

REGISTER FOR THE WEBINAR

Join the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Energy Technologies Office (SETO) for a webinar focused on workforce development in the solar industry. Learn about SETO’s current research and future priorities for building a diverse and well-supported solar industry workforce, including results from recent stakeholder outreach. SETO Deputy Director Garrett Nilsen will give an update on the latest SETO activities. The webinar will also include a panel of solar workforce experts including Rob Wallace, CEO of Power52 Energy Solutions, and Chris Perron, Senior Vice President of Engineering, Procurement, and Construction at Nexamp.

 

View a list of all upcoming SETO events and browse past webinars below.

Clean Cities Coalition Network

Author: US DOE Staff       Published: 8/16/2021         Clean Cities

 

Building Partnerships to Advance Affordable, Domestic Transportation Fuels and Technologies

 Resources

Resources

Use these resources to make decisions about advanced transportation technologies and explore fuel economy information for new and used vehicles.

icon of alternative fueling station nozzles

Alternative Fuels Data Center

icon of a fuel economy and environment label

FuelEconomy.gov

U.S. Electric Transportation Workforce Set to Double by 2024

Author:  Adam Winer            Published: 8/11/2021     AEE

EV Supply Chain Report Form Imagev5

 New report finds U.S. electric transportation industry is projected to nearly double over five years, creating an additional 141,000 jobs, with additional 2 million workers able to quickly retrain to benefit from market growth

WASHINGTON, DC, August 11, 2021 — Today national business group Advanced Energy Economy (AEE) released an analysis quantifying the nationwide economic benefits of a growing electric transportation industry. As demand for electric vehicles (EVs) and investment in EV charging infrastructure grows, industry employment is expected to double from 2019 levels to nearly 300,000 jobs by 2024.

“Economic opportunities will ripple throughout the supply chain and maintenance sectors as the domestic electric vehicle industry grows quickly over the next few years,” said Ryan Gallentine, policy director at AEE. “The electric vehicle industry already employs people across all 50 states, and policymakers should expand those opportunities with incentive programs that make it easier for consumers and business fleets to fully electrify.”

The report, Building an Electric Transportation Economy in the United States,” produced by BW Research Partnership for AEE, analyzes the current electric transportation industry across the U.S.

The report finds that the U.S. electric transportation workforce:

  • Will reach 296,000 workers by 2024 (up from about 155,000 in 2019), with that number pushing over 370,000 in 2025;
  • Was distributed across 15,200 electric transportation businesses in 2019, contributing an estimated $29 billion in GDP; and
  • Has 2.1 million people working in “adjacent” industries with skill sets that would allow them and the companies they work for to transition to the electric transportation industry with “little additional training or upskilling required.”

The report features company snapshots for EVgo, America’s largest public fast charging network, Rivian, an independent U.S. manufacturer of all-electric trucks, SUVs and delivery vans, and Hickok Waekon, an over 100-year-old Ohio-based component manufacturer that makes diagnostic scan tools for both combustion engines and electric vehicles.

The report recommends policies that will be important to helping people who currently work in the traditional automotive field transition their skills to new opportunities.

“Programs that examine these workers’ skills and transition opportunities will be essential in fostering an electrified transportation eco-system that benefits all Americans,” adds Gallentine.

Supply chain bottlenecks in components, such as lithium-ion batteries and semiconductors, are also identified in the report, along with recommended policies that would expand domestic production of these vital components to make supply chains more resilient while bolstering the nation’s economy.

A downloadable version of the report is available here.

Background Materials

Innovations Internship

Author: Renewable Energy Buyers Alliance   Published: 8/11/2021     Indeed

Renewable Energy Buyers Alliance
Washington, DC 20005
Remote
$25 an hour – Part-time
Apply Now
Job details
Salary

$25 an hour

Job Type
Part-time

Full Job Description

Renewable Energy Internship Opportunity (Part-Time, Remote)

Location: Remote OR 1425 K St NW, Suite 1110, Washington, DC 20005

Who we are

The Renewable Energy Buyers Alliance (REBA) is a community of energy buyers accelerating the zero-carbon energy future—greening the grid for all. We are an alliance of large clean energy buyers, energy providers, service providers, and NGOs, who are unlocking the marketplace for all non-residential energy buyers to lead a rapid transition to a cleaner, prosperous, zero-carbon energy future. Learn more: https://rebuyers.org/.

We value Respect in our treatment of people and the planet; Integrity in how we conduct ourselves; Service to REBA’s mission, members, and colleagues; and Excellence in our programs and work. Diversity is critical to realizing a zero-carbon energy system. We invite collaboration among people with different perspectives, identities, and ideas because innovative solutions to these complex challenges come from great minds who do not think alike.

Why intern with us?
REBA Interns gain professional skills and experience while working alongside our world-class team of supportive and collaborative individuals. You will build understanding of complex system change, the renewable energy industry, as well as how a trade association operates day-to-day. You’ll become part of a respectful community of staff and interns dedicated to building the zero-carbon future while offering your unique skills to achieving our goals.

Internship Structure

  • Compensation: $25/hour.
  • Benefits: Most intern positions are not eligible for benefits except for paid sick leave related to covid-19. All are eligible for 1 paid Friday off per month.
  • Educational credit: Eligibility for credit is determined by your educational institution
  • Schedule: 20 hours/week. Weekly schedule is flexible and will be determined with your supervisor.
  • Location: This position may be performed remotely from any U.S. location with reliable internet access or at the REBA office at 1425 K St NW, Washington, DC.
  • Term: 3 months, with possibility to extend based on performance and availability.
  • Start Date: Projected for 9/7/21 with some flexibility based on your availability.
  • Intern Support: Interns work directly in one or more of REBA’s programs and quickly become an essential part of the team. Your Supervisor will support daily and weekly projects and tasks throughout your internship. You will also connect with a Mentor who helps ensure that you have a positive experience and are working toward individual learning objectives which you determine together.

About the Innovations Internship

As an intern with the Innovations team, you will support work that solves the toughest policy, regulatory, and market barriers in clean energy. The Innovations team enhances the ability of REBA’s members to engage on policy and market design by providing research, analysis, and actionable information so members are equipped to achieve their sustainability and clean energy goals. The Innovations team also engages with federal and state policymakers, along with other key stakeholders, to communicate large energy buyers’ policy needs and priorities.

Intern Responsibilities

The Innovations intern will support the creation and dissemination of policy-focused content. Given the diversity of REBA’s membership, and the Innovations team’s expansive issue portfolio, the intern is expected to engage on a wide-ranging set of policies. Specific tasks include:

  • Furthering REBA’s policy advocacy at the federal level by mapping the locations of REBA members’ facilities to Congressional districts.
  • Tracking updates to energy-related legislation and regulations at the state level, with particular emphasis on the Southeastern United States.
  • Supporting REBA’s engagement with Congress.
  • Reviewing recent submissions or issuances at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC).
  • Remotely attending FERC monthly meetings and technical conferences as directed.
  • Aiding in the planning and execution of REBA meetings, webinars, and other interactions with members by developing agendas, presentations, and related materials.
  • Assisting in the creation of REBA newsletters and other internal communications materials to inform members about ongoing policy initiatives.
  • Supporting the development of external-facing communications (e.g., position papers, op-eds, blog posts) to elevate the voice of large energy buyers in policy discussions.

Qualifications

  • Actively enrolled in undergraduate or graduate course of study
  • Prior internship experience in federal or state government is preferred, but not required
  • Advanced knowledge of Microsoft Excel and PowerPoint is preferred, but not required
  • Passion for achieving REBA’s vision of a resilient zero-carbon energy system
  • Commitment to REBA’s core values of Respect, Integrity, Service and Excellence (RISE)
  • Able to work effectively with others in a collaborative, supportive environment
  • Strong written and verbal communicator or strong commitment to improving these skills
  • Eligible to work in the U.S.

Additional Information

Submit your cover letter and resume on via BambooHR portal. Resumes will be accepted until 8:00 AM ET on 8/20/21.

REBA is an Equal Opportunity Employer where applicants are considered without regard to race, ethnicity, color, age, sex, religion, national origin, ancestry, pregnancy, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, genetic information, physical or mental disability, registered domestic partner status, caregiver status, marital status, veteran or military status, citizenship status, or any other legally protected category.

Renewable Energy Buyers Alliance

5 days ago
If you require alternative methods of application or screening, you must approach the employer directly to request this as Indeed is not responsible for the employer’s application process.

As Senate passes infrastructure bill, Democrats eye opportunity for more energy spending

Author: Jason Plautz  Contributor    Published: 8/11/2021      Utility Dive

Dive Brief:

  • More than 180 House Democrats called on House leadership to include tax credits for clean energy, residential electrification and commercial and residential energy efficiency improvements as part of an infrastructure package moving through Congress.
  • The Senate on Tuesday passed a $1 trillion infrastructure bill that includes $73 billion in grid modernization and $7.5 billion to build electric vehicle chargers. The bill passed in a 69-30 vote with the support of 19 Republicans and now must pass the House.
  • Democrats have also teed up a $3.5 trillion budget reconciliation package that will include a clean electricity payment program, a clean energy technology accelerator, consumer rebates for electrification and clean energy tax credits, according to a summary released by Senate Democrats. The Senate passed the resolution 50-49 on Wednesday morning before the chamber adjourned for summer recess.

Dive Insight:

The $1 trillion bill passed by the Senate Tuesday, titled the INVEST in America Act, was the result of months of negotiations between Republicans and Democrats and represented a step back from the ambitious agenda first introduced by the Biden administration. The final version of the bill did include funding for electric transmission improvements, including the creation of a Grid Deployment Authority to oversee electricity grid upgrades, plus additional siting authority for the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The bill would also spend more on nuclear power and carbon capture technology.

However, the bill included less money that the administration had originally proposed for clean energy, climate resilience and removed some energy tax credits, including a production tax credit for energy storage that the Biden administration had proposed. That left some environmentalists cool, with critics saying the bill does not reflect the scale of investment needed to tackle climate change.

“We welcome the bipartisan package because it will result in critical contributions toward building the clean economy of the future, setting the stage for the bold initiatives and additional policies that are necessary to prevent the catastrophic human and economic impacts of the climate crisis,” Anne Kelly, vice president of government relations at Ceres, said in a statement. “But Congress must take further action soon to confront the crisis directly and build a stronger, more just, and more competitive U.S. economy.”

House Democrats must still pass the INVEST in America Act and could make changes to the bill. Progressives, for example, have said they’d like to see more funding for climate programs and clean transportation, either in that bill or in the larger reconciliation package.

In their letter to House leadership, the Democrats — led by Reps. Earl Blumenauer, D-Ore., Nanette Diaz Barragán, D-Calif., Jason Crow, D-Colo., Mike Levin, D-Calif., and Donald McEachin, D-Va. — called for the inclusion of a suite of clean energy tax incentives in a final infrastructure bill. Specifically, the letter calls for long-term extensions and expansions to the production tax credit and investment tax credit to fund renewable energy projects, extensions to incentives for energy efficiency and expanded tax incentives for clean transportation and alternative fuels. The Democrats also say the bill should support domestic clean energy and transportation manufacturing.

“The importance of clean energy tax policy is made even more apparent and urgent with record-high temperatures in the Pacific Northwest, unprecedented drought across the West, and the impacts of tropical storms felt up and down the East Coast,” they wrote.

The $3.5 trillion budget reconciliation package, which the Senate began voting on Tuesday, includes more ambitious climate and clean energy provisions. An outline released by Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., includes clean energy tax credits. In a statement, Senate Finance Committee chairman Ron Wyden, D-Ore., said the Clean Energy for America Act would be the “linchpin” of the efforts. That bill would overhaul energy taxes to create a clean energy production tax credit worth 2.5 cents per kWh electricity produced and creates a 30% investment tax credit for grid improvements, among other provisions.

As part of the budget reconciliation package, the Senate also adopted a non-binding amendment 90-9 that would block renewable energy projects from purchasing materials produced in China, if they receive federal funds or subsidies. In another non-binding vote, the Senate unanimously rejected enacting the Green New Deal.

The budget package gives the Energy and Natural Resources Committee $198 billion. That committee’s section includes a Clean Energy Payment Program, a form of a clean energy standard that would use fines and payments to incentivize utilities to adopt renewable energy. The Energy Committee language also includes additional weatherization rebates for consumers, financing for domestic manufacturing of clean energy materials and federal procurement of energy efficient materials.

In addition, the reconciliation package includes $67 billion for the Environment and Public Works Committee, including a Clean Energy Technology Accelerator to fund solar energy for low-income communities and other new technology. The committee’s section also includes environmental justice initiatives, federal investments in energy efficient buildings and materials and spending on clean vehicles.

The funding offsets include a fee for producers of methane emissions and a carbon polluter import fee, which would raise tariffs on imports from countries that do not have aggressive climate plans.

In a statement, Edison Electric Institute (EEI) president Tom Kuhn praised the passage of the Senate infrastructure bill, saying it would “make significant investments in the critical energy infrastructure and new carbon-free technologies we need to deliver a 100% clean energy future to the customers and communities we serve.”

“Achieving this will require new, affordable, 24/7, carbon-free technologies, and this legislation significantly would boost research, development, demonstration, and deployment funding for these new clean energy technologies,” Kuhn said.

As Senate passes infrastructure bill, Democrats eye opportunity for more energy spending

Author: Jason Plautz  Contributor    Published: 8/11/2021      Utility Dive

Dive Brief:

  • More than 180 House Democrats called on House leadership to include tax credits for clean energy, residential electrification and commercial and residential energy efficiency improvements as part of an infrastructure package moving through Congress.
  • The Senate on Tuesday passed a $1 trillion infrastructure bill that includes $73 billion in grid modernization and $7.5 billion to build electric vehicle chargers. The bill passed in a 69-30 vote with the support of 19 Republicans and now must pass the House.
  • Democrats have also teed up a $3.5 trillion budget reconciliation package that will include a clean electricity payment program, a clean energy technology accelerator, consumer rebates for electrification and clean energy tax credits, according to a summary released by Senate Democrats. The Senate passed the resolution 50-49 on Wednesday morning before the chamber adjourned for summer recess.

Dive Insight:

The $1 trillion bill passed by the Senate Tuesday, titled the INVEST in America Act, was the result of months of negotiations between Republicans and Democrats and represented a step back from the ambitious agenda first introduced by the Biden administration. The final version of the bill did include funding for electric transmission improvements, including the creation of a Grid Deployment Authority to oversee electricity grid upgrades, plus additional siting authority for the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The bill would also spend more on nuclear power and carbon capture technology.

However, the bill included less money that the administration had originally proposed for clean energy, climate resilience and removed some energy tax credits, including a production tax credit for energy storage that the Biden administration had proposed. That left some environmentalists cool, with critics saying the bill does not reflect the scale of investment needed to tackle climate change.

“We welcome the bipartisan package because it will result in critical contributions toward building the clean economy of the future, setting the stage for the bold initiatives and additional policies that are necessary to prevent the catastrophic human and economic impacts of the climate crisis,” Anne Kelly, vice president of government relations at Ceres, said in a statement. “But Congress must take further action soon to confront the crisis directly and build a stronger, more just, and more competitive U.S. economy.”

House Democrats must still pass the INVEST in America Act and could make changes to the bill. Progressives, for example, have said they’d like to see more funding for climate programs and clean transportation, either in that bill or in the larger reconciliation package.

In their letter to House leadership, the Democrats — led by Reps. Earl Blumenauer, D-Ore., Nanette Diaz Barragán, D-Calif., Jason Crow, D-Colo., Mike Levin, D-Calif., and Donald McEachin, D-Va. — called for the inclusion of a suite of clean energy tax incentives in a final infrastructure bill. Specifically, the letter calls for long-term extensions and expansions to the production tax credit and investment tax credit to fund renewable energy projects, extensions to incentives for energy efficiency and expanded tax incentives for clean transportation and alternative fuels. The Democrats also say the bill should support domestic clean energy and transportation manufacturing.

“The importance of clean energy tax policy is made even more apparent and urgent with record-high temperatures in the Pacific Northwest, unprecedented drought across the West, and the impacts of tropical storms felt up and down the East Coast,” they wrote.

The $3.5 trillion budget reconciliation package, which the Senate began voting on Tuesday, includes more ambitious climate and clean energy provisions. An outline released by Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., includes clean energy tax credits. In a statement, Senate Finance Committee chairman Ron Wyden, D-Ore., said the Clean Energy for America Act would be the “linchpin” of the efforts. That bill would overhaul energy taxes to create a clean energy production tax credit worth 2.5 cents per kWh electricity produced and creates a 30% investment tax credit for grid improvements, among other provisions.

As part of the budget reconciliation package, the Senate also adopted a non-binding amendment 90-9 that would block renewable energy projects from purchasing materials produced in China, if they receive federal funds or subsidies. In another non-binding vote, the Senate unanimously rejected enacting the Green New Deal.

The budget package gives the Energy and Natural Resources Committee $198 billion. That committee’s section includes a Clean Energy Payment Program, a form of a clean energy standard that would use fines and payments to incentivize utilities to adopt renewable energy. The Energy Committee language also includes additional weatherization rebates for consumers, financing for domestic manufacturing of clean energy materials and federal procurement of energy efficient materials.

In addition, the reconciliation package includes $67 billion for the Environment and Public Works Committee, including a Clean Energy Technology Accelerator to fund solar energy for low-income communities and other new technology. The committee’s section also includes environmental justice initiatives, federal investments in energy efficient buildings and materials and spending on clean vehicles.

The funding offsets include a fee for producers of methane emissions and a carbon polluter import fee, which would raise tariffs on imports from countries that do not have aggressive climate plans.

In a statement, Edison Electric Institute (EEI) president Tom Kuhn praised the passage of the Senate infrastructure bill, saying it would “make significant investments in the critical energy infrastructure and new carbon-free technologies we need to deliver a 100% clean energy future to the customers and communities we serve.”

“Achieving this will require new, affordable, 24/7, carbon-free technologies, and this legislation significantly would boost research, development, demonstration, and deployment funding for these new clean energy technologies,” Kuhn said.

Embracing EV Adoption Programs to Boost Tenant Satisfaction & Keep Occupancy Rates UP

Author: Sheryl E. Ponds BSME, MBA  Published: 10/14/2020         Dia TechCorp

Cost Savings on EVCS Infrastructure

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Sheryl E. Ponds
Founder/CEO
Dai Technologies Corporation

c/o DaiTech Operations Team
o. 202.918.9372 ext 403

Now, while Dai Technologies Corporation understands the concern of the tenants in search of charging stations, we also understand that sometimes for large multi-family developments with public parking facilities or street parking, adding the infrastructure necessary to provide this amenity can be costly.

That is where the District’s Make Ready program comes in. This exclusive opportunity for those who own and/or operate street parking or public parking facilities will help to alleviate the financial burden of setting up the infrastructure required to accommodate electric vehicle charging stations.

Through applying to be a recipient of this unique utility sponsored program, you can save UP TO nearly 60% on the cost of installing electric vehicle charging stations (EVCS’s) for your residential communities. That equates to tens of thousands of dollars towards profitability, with the opportunity to retain and attract more tenants driving electric vehicles.

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The Affect of COVID-19 on Renters

There is no question that COVID-19 has changed the landscape of businesses across the country. But one thing management sometimes forgets is how the changes can affect individuals, and how that change will in turn affect their business. Sound familiar? As a property manager or landlord, your tenants are your livelihood. They are who pays your bills and keeps your community thriving. You need to consider how the shift in work-life has impacted them and their satisfaction with your property!

For Raquel and Reggie, D.C. multifamily dwellers who live and work in the city, COVID-19 has made the once simple task of charging up their electric vehicles (EV) incredibly difficult. In the blink of an eye, charging became unimaginably inconvenient, having to travel farther from home to find an EVCS.

At Dai Technologies Corporation we’ve been talking to reliable tenants like Raquel and Reggie since the onset of COVID-19. What we’re finding is that apartment renters in the Washington D.C. area DO drive electric vehicles, and up until COVID-19, charging their cars wasn’t an issue regardless of where they lived. They drove to the office, energized their automobiles while they worked, shopped or visited a government building like the library, then they went home. These convenient charging options were part of their decision when they purchased their EV, a car that they’ve now fallen in love with and won’t get rid of.

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The issue with this, Raquel and Reggie’s access to a charging station will begin to affect property managers and landlords.  The majority of those working in the Washington area are working fully remote with no full-time return to the office in sight. Individuals like Raquel and Reggie with electric cars and no charging stations at home are beginning to re-evaluate their living situations. From their point of view, it is an extreme inconvenience to leave the comforts and safety of their home to charge their car.  Their current, “non-chargeable” situation is enough to force them to start looking for other places to live.

As a property manager or landlord, if you were to install a few electric car charging stations throughout your public parking areas, don’t you think you’d reap the benefits? You would have happy tenants that would spread the word about your incredible amenities, capturing other tenants leaving their current living situations, to rent from a property with amenities like EVCSs on-site. Don’t let your NOI take a hit from this situation, it is time to be proactive!  Learn more about saving on the costs of EV charging infrastructure and install your EV charging amenities through Make Ready.

Join Our Upcoming Webinar 

Join the webinar to learn how Dai Technologies Corporation aka DaiTechCorp can help you with a site assessment consult and guide you through your Make Ready program approval. If you’re a District-based business with public parking facilities, we will help you navigate the application process, obtain your approval, and deal with the bureaucracy that is always entangled with regulated programs such as this.

DaiTechCorp is committed to helping tenants gain accessible facilities for electric vehicle charging at home, while also helping property managers grow their tenant satisfaction and fill more empty spaces. What more could you want?

Discover your EVCS options and learn more about the Make Ready program today. 

Click HERE to register.

Webinar Registration Link:  https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZEsduquqDwiHtcAU1knLjjZ2x2gHmDvixO7

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